Category

News

Using herbicide for control of gorse

By | News | No Comments

There are many options available to attack gorse but what method you choose will depend on some of the following circumstances;

  • Machinery availability i.e. mulching equipment, spray unit, knapsack
  • Own expertise and labour available
  • Access to the treatment area i.e. terrain
  • Amount of money you have available to allocate to the job
  • Amount of area to be treated

The above photo shows the effectiveness of herbicide used on a large infestation of gorse that was sprayed in December 2016 by a contractor. The size of the plants were generally between 0.6 to 1.5 meters tall. Overall excellent results with 99% kill rate of gorse.

I have had experience in using both spraying and mulching control methods. I have found that generally there is only need to spray new seedlings  annually after the larger infestations are reduced or removed from the property. When undertaking gorse spraying I usually contact my local Landcare Group and borrow their high volume spray unit.

To get an effective kill of gorse you need to follow the directions for use of the chemical as detailed by the manufacturer, paying particular attention to rain events and the volume of the mix i.e. chemical to water ratio.

I have always mixed a red dye into the spray unit as you can readily see what you have sprayed. In areas where there are many gorse seedlings you can easily miss treating a few. If you miss it this year it will be most likely be twice as big next year and you will need to use more chemical.

The below photo shows gorse that has not had a 100% kill rate and one contributing factor may be that spray coverage over the gorse plants was not thorough enough. Herbicide manufacturer’s instructions for woody weeds are to provide: ’Thorough coverage of foliage to the point of run-off is essential, however avoid excess spraying which is wasteful of chemical’.

Brian Rowe – VGT committee member

Mulching as the first step in controlling gorse

By | News | No Comments

One of the dilemmas one faces when confronted with a head high impenetrable wall of gorse is …where do I start? As demonstrated at the field day conducted by the Tylden Landcare group the use of the eco blade technology in which the gorse is mulched and the trunks painted with herbicide is one way to start.

The accompanying photos show a roadside at Glenlyon where the Hepburn Shire has undertaken mulching with swinging head mulcher attached to a tractor to reduce dense gorse to a manageable level and a paddock on private property where an impenetrable wall of gorse has been returned to a lawn by initial mulching with heavy equipment followed by regular follow up with a ride on mulcher.

In both instances the stumps of gorse and the seedbank are still in the ground the areas will require  follow up treatment generally involving the use of herbicide on the freshly germinated plants or combined with the mulching to have a long term impact.

The National Best Practice Manual for Gorse published by the Australian Government in partnership the Tasmanian Government provides examples of the various options to return gorse infested land to production and emphasizes the importance of conducting follow up for at least two years before revegetating the land with grasses or shrubs.

John Cable – VGT committee member